Succulents

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Water Requirements: Succulents like to be watered when soil is completely dry all the way through. In small pots it typically takes about 1-2 weeks in Spring/Summer for soil to dry out given proper light requirements. In Fall/Winter it typically takes 3-4 weeks for soil to dry out. Once soil is dry, give the plant a thorough watering (water until the water drains out of drainage holes in pot).

DO NOT let succulent roots sit in standing water. They are very susceptible to root rot. And once they get it, it is pretty much impossible to bring it back to life. Unless you are a super McMaster at watering plants, planting succulents in containers without drainage holes is highly not recommended. Yes, even if the container has rocks on the bottom. Even with rocks at bottom for "drainage" you can accidentally add more water than necessary without knowing how much may be sitting at bottom; which leaves the succulent roots prone to rotting. 

Light Requirements: Succulents need really good bright light to thrive. In small pots, in Spring/Summer when sun is hottest, it's best to keep the succulents out of direct sun on hottest days especially if you live in region with dry hot summers. Never leave your plant in a window that gets direct sun during hottest times of day. Your little plant buddies can get sunburned. 

Fertilizer: Not totally necessary for succulents, but to promote more rigorous growth and flowering, give them a small dose of diluted balanced houseplant fertilizer once at beginning of growing season (Spring).


Foliage Plants

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"Foliage plants" is a broad term typically used to describe common household plants. Below, you will find a list with important info about some of the most common household plant varieties that The Potted Poppy works with and varieties you typically see in plant retail stores. 

Watering Requirements: A general rule of thumb to keep in mind when it comes to watering is that watering frequency will depend on how much light the plant receives:

More light = more frequent watering   •  Less light = less frequent watering

When it's time to water plant, make sure to give it a thorough watering. This means watering plant until water comes out of the drainage holes from the bottom of the pot. This will ensure you that the water made its way down to the roots. However, you never want plant roots to sit in water for a long period of time. If there is excess water in the drainage tray for more than 10 minutes, make sure to dump out the excess water (preferably into another plant for conservation purposes).

Fertilizer: The plants listed below will do fine without fertilizer. For more vigorous growth, fertilize once a month or every other month with a balanced plant fertilizer during growing season (Spring/Summer).


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Parlor Palm (Chamaedorea elegans)

• NON-TOXIC to pets •

Temperature: Average warmth - Minimum 50 degrees in winter.

Light: Can thrive in low light or bright indirect sunlight. Keep away from direct sunlight.

Water: Water when soil is dry to the touch about an inch down into soil. During Spring and Summer, you'll want to water more liberally, but it's always best to feel the soil before to avoid overwatering. You never want the soil to be soggy. Watering once a week is sufficient for these hardy plants. During Fall and Winter, watering can typically be reduced to about every 10-14 days. 

Humidity: If the plant location is typically warm, mist the plant every couple of days. Keep plant aways from drafts.


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Pothos (Scindapsus aureus)

• TOXIC to pets if ingested •

Temperature: Average warmth - Minimum 50-55 degrees in winter.

Light: Bright indirect light is best. Keep away from direct sunlight. Can tolerate lower light areas but leaf variegation will fade if light is too low. 

Water: Water when soil is dry to the touch about an inch down into soil. During Spring and Summer, you'll want to water more liberally, but it's always best to feel the soil before to avoid overwatering. You never want the soil to be soggy. Watering once a week is sufficient for these hardy plants. During Fall and Winter, watering can typically be reduced to about every 10-14 days.

Humidity: If the plant location is typically warm, mist the plant every couple of days. Keep plant aways from drafts.


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Monstera (Monstera deliciosa)

• TOXIC to pets if ingested •

Temperature: Average warmth - Minimum 50 degrees in winter. Active growth starts at 65 degrees

Light: Bright indirect light is best. Keep away from direct sun. 

Water: Water when soil is dry to the touch about an inch down into soil. During Spring and Summer, you'll want to water more liberally, but it's always best to feel the soil before to avoid overwatering. You never want the soil to be soggy. Watering once a week is sufficient for these hardy plants. During Fall and Winter, watering can typically be reduced to about every 10-14 days.

Humidity: If the plant location is typically warm, mist the plant every couple of days. Keep plant aways from drafts.


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Philodendron

• TOXIC to pets if ingested •

Temperature: Average warmth - Minimum 55 degrees in winter.

Light: Can tolerate low light, but will thrive in bright indirect sunlight.

Water: Water when soil is dry to the touch about an inch down into soil. During spring and summer, you'll want to water more liberally, but it's always best to feel the soil before to avoid overwatering. You never want the soil to be soggy. Watering once a week is sufficient for these hardy plants. During Fall and Winter, watering can typically be reduced to about every 10-14 days.

Humidity: If the plant location is typically warm, mist the plant every couple of days.


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Calathea

• NON-TOXIC to pets •

Temperature: Average warmth -Maintain minimum winter temp of 60 degrees for Calathea. Keep away from drafts.

Light: Can tolerate low light, but will thrive in bright indirect sunlight. Leaf colors will fade if given too much light.

Water: Keep soil consistently damp (not soggy). 

Humidity: Mist leaves regularly. This plant does well in a bathroom with a window or skylight. It will thrive with the humidity from the shower.


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Fiddle Leaf Fig (Ficus lyrata) 

• TOXIC to pets if ingested •

Temperature: Average warmth - Minimum 50-55 degrees in winter.

Light: Bright indirect light is best.

Water: Allow soil to dry out some in between waterings. In winter water very sparingly. 

Humidity: Mist leaves occasionally in Summer


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Bird's Nest Fern (Asplenium nidus)

• NON-TOXIC to pets •

Temperature: Average warmth - Keep between 60-70 degrees

Light: Bright indirect light is best. Can tolerate lower light areas.

Water: Keep soil consistently damp (not soggy). 

Humidity: Mist leaves regularly.


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Staghorn Fern (Platycerium)

• NON-TOXIC to pets •

Temperature: Average warmth - Keep between 60-70 degrees

Light: Bright indirect light is best. Can tolerate lower light areas.

Water: Keep soil consistently damp (not soggy). If you have a mounted Staghorn Fern, soak the plant in a bucket of water or bowl for about 10 minutes per week. Reduce watering in winter.

Humidity: Mist leaves regularly.


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Peperomia

• NON-TOXIC to pets •

Temperature: Average warmth - Minimum 50-55 degrees in winter.

Light: Bright indirect light is best.

Water: Water when soil is dry to the touch about an inch down into soil. During spring and summer, you'll want to water more liberally, but it's always best to feel the soil before to avoid overwatering. You never want the soil to be soggy. Watering once a week is sufficient for these hardy plants. During fall and winter, watering can typically be reduced to about every 10-14 days.

Humidity: Mist leaves occasionally in summer- never in winter.


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Bromeliad

• NON-TOXIC to pets •

Temperature: To encourage flowering, higher temperatures (above 75 degrees) are required. Foliage and plants already in flower require average warmth (minimum of 50 degrees)

Light: Bright indirect light.

Water: Keep the central "cup" (point of which all leaves come together) of plant filled with water. Water the soil only when it has dried out. Do not allow soil to be soggy.

Humidity: Mist leaves in summer

Fertilizer: Due to the epiphytic nature of Bromeliads, they receive their nutrients through their leaves. So, to fertilize, dilute a liquid fertilizer in a spray bottle with water and mist leaves about once a month during growing season.